Product Test – Finger Splint

Recommended Finger Splint
Arrow Splints

  • Highest Quality Materials
  • Comfortable Wrap-Around Foam Padding
  • Perfect for Finger Sprains and Strains
  • Ligament and Joint Support
  • Arthritis Relief
  • Reusable

 

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“We spent hours testing various finger splints before determining that Arrow Finger Splints are the best overall pick for finger support.  Their easy-to-use and adjustable design makes them a great finger support for a variety of finger injuries.  We also liked that they can be used either to stabilize and heal injuries, or just as a bit of extra support.”

-Tim Warner, Sports & Fitness, Director of Testing

4 mins to read
28 products considered
13 products tested
34 hours reviewing

Top 3 out of 15 Brands We Tested

Arrow Splints

Best All-Around
(Multiple Conditions Finger Splint)
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FOMI

Best Splint for Icing
(Chills to Reduce Swelling)
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Copper Compression Gear
Best for Firm Support
(Full Finger-length Support)
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Finger Splint

Fingers are an important part of daily life. You need them for nearly every task you do throughout the day and would have a hard time getting anything done without them.  Because of this, it’s no wonder they get hurt or even broken from time to time.  When you need to help your fingers heal, you’ll recover more quickly by using a finger splint.  Selection of the best splint for your situation will vary based on which finger is hurt and the severity of your injury.

Best Finger Splint

To help heal your finger, you’ll need the best finger splint for your exact injury.  Healing an injured or broken finger can interfere with your everyday life.  Simple projects such as errands, chores, and even work can cause you pain.  A splint can help get you through your daily activities without further exacerbating your injury. The best finger brace will depend on your specific injury and lifestyle.  There are a variety of finger splint styles out there, and you’ll need to decide which is best for your situation.

Types of Healing Finger Splints

  • Padded aluminum splint – This style of splint holds the entire length of your finger in a relaxed and neutral, extended position. This reduces the level of pain and assists with trouble-free healing.  The finger is cradled in soft, padded foam while the outside of the splint is made of rigid aluminum. These splints are lightweight, easy-to-use and readily available.
  • Finger cold pack – A finger cold pack is used more on a temporary basis, often for only a few hours a day. They can provide double-action treatment because they both cool the finger to reduce swelling and keep it still to assist with healing.  This style of finger splint is kept in the freezer until needed and then slipped onto your finger like a sleeve.
  • Double finger splint – This style splint is often worn to help with healing from sports injuries. The method is simple: you wrap the injured finger together with a finger next to it. The healthy finger provides support to the injured finger while both fingers remain rigid.
  • Oval-8 Finger Splint – An Oval-8 splint is a convenient and comfortable way to stabilize the small joints of your finger. They offer a 3-point pressure design and are great for trigger finger, mallet finger, swan neck and arthritis.

Why Wear a Finger Splint?

Family physicians and emergency room doctors are most often the people who will decide if you need a splint or not.  Depending on your injury you may be told to wear a splint for four weeks, or even longer.  A few of the most common reasons for wearing a finger splint are:

  • Mallet Finger – Mallet finger, also called Baseball Finger occurs when the extensor tendon in your finger has been injured. It only affects a small part of your finger but can become a large problem if it’s left untreated.  It’s important to treat mallet finger as quickly as possible to reach a full recovery.
  • Trigger Finger – Trigger finger is a condition caused by swelling and inflammation or even scarring of the tendon sheath in your finger. This will cause your affected finger to snap or lock when you open or close it.
  • Broken Finger – If you think you have a broken finger you are likely experiencing pain and swelling. As the swelling continues, your finger will become stiff and immobile.  With a hairline fracture, you may only need to wear a finger splint which will protect your finger.  Ice can help with the swelling but be sure to contact your doctor and don’t treat this completely on your own.
  • Sprained Finger – A sprained finger happens when your finger ligaments that connect and support your bones and joints are damaged. Finger sprains are very common and can also be very painful and become swollen and difficult to move. Most sprains can be treated at home by wearing a finger splint and following the RICE method:  Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation.

Advantages of Wearing a Finger Splint vs. a Cast

There are advantages to wearing a finger splint versus wearing a cast.  Most obvious is the ability to take off a splint as needed instead of it staying on continuously for weeks. Some of the other advantages include:

  • Allows for a bit of swelling
  • Decreases the risk of possible complications
  • Faster and easier application

Finger Splint Conclusion

Finger braces or finger splints can be readily purchased and are easy to use.  Many studies show that a simple, foam-padded splint is the best choice for a simple finger injury or sprain.  Be sure to splint your finger in a slightly-flexed, downward-curving position and leave the splint on for five days to one week.  Once it’s removed, you’ll need to gently exercise and move your finger to help it regain its full range of motion.  Be sure to stop or reduce any exercise that increases your pain or makes you feel uncomfortable.


Recommended Finger Splint

Arrow Splints

  • Highest Quality Materials
  • Comfortable Wrap-Around Foam Padding
  • Perfect for Finger Sprains and Strains
  • Ligament and Joint Support
  • Arthritis Relief
  • Reusable

 

View on Amazon
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